We’re all familiar with 1 Timothy 3:15-16. I quote the ASV below:

but if I tarry long, that thou mayest know how men ought to behave themselves in the house of God, which is the church of the living God, the pillar and ground of the truth. (16) And without controversy great is the mystery of godliness; He who was manifested in the flesh, Justified in the spirit, Seen of angels, Preached among the nations, Believed on in the world, Received up in glory.

But today I was reading in the Emphatic Diaglott, which is a Greek-English interlinear. This interlinear presents the Greek text of Griesbach, a very famous Greek scholar from the early 1800s, whose text was considered at the time to be the most accurate printed Greek text. Interestingly, Greisbach’s punctuation does something that no modern translation (1900 and beyond) has followed. He punctuates the text so that the pillar and ground of the truth does not refer to the church but to the next verse. Editing the ASV to match Greisbach’s punctuation, we get:

but if I tarry long, that thou mayest know how men ought to behave themselves in the house of God, which is the church of the living God. The pillar and ground of the truth, (16) and without controversy great, is the mystery of godliness; He who was manifested in the flesh, Justified in the spirit, Seen of angels, Preached among the nations, Believed on in the world, Received up in glory.

You end up with a statement that this little confession is the pillar and ground of the truth, and also unquestionably great.

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